Ted Anthony Roberts

Swashbuckling Author

The Sea Journal

Note (on this and all my writings): the following text is merely a "rough draft" of what the final product shall be. The final "smooth draft" (if I may so call it) will perhaps read somewhat differently; however, the main ideas shall remain!  

 

An Upcoming Swashbuckling Book!

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

A Swashbuckling, Piratical Adventure

 

 

Presented by: Ted Anthony Roberts

(c)copyright 2017 by Ted Anthony Roberts and The Swashbuckling Press 

 

 

THE

ANTICIPATED & LONG AWAITED

FINAL CHAPTER,

OF THAT WHICH HAD BEEN PUBLISHED

IN FORMER YEARS,

AND KNOWN BY ITS FORMER TITLE

THE SEA JOURNAL,

TAKEN FROM TWO DOCUMENTATIONS,

AS BEING WRITTEN IN THIS SAID SEA JOURNAL

BY THE HAND OF AN UNKNOWN PYRATE,

WHICH PROVED, AFTER THIS LENGTH OF TIME,

AS TO BEING AUTHENTIC HISTORY.

AND OF A RECENT ADVENTURE

WHICH THE AUTHOR HAD EXPERIENCED FIRST HAND,

AND WHICH CLOSES THE MYSTERIES

WHICH LAYED BEHIND THE

AFOREMENTIONED SEA JOURNAL

 

EDITED AND RELEASED

BY HIS MAJESTY'S KIND PERMISSION

THROUGH SIR JOHN ROE

LONDON, A.D. 1701

THIRD VOLUME

PUBLISHED BY THE “ADMIRAL’S STERN”

LONDON, ENGLAND, PATRICK JONE’S STREET

 

AND NOW SET FORTH WITH UPDATED REVISIONS

AND MODERN SPELLINGS

BY TED ANTHONY ROBERTS

A.D. 2017

 

 

DISCLAIMER FROM SIR JOHN ROE

            As to the publication of this third volume, I must admit to my readers that most names written herein (as it is in the other publications) have changed to protect those who have wished to remain unknown, seeing as most of these said individuals are still living even unto this day. That is, except for the main Pirate Captain in my narrative, of course – for it is his story, and to the passion in which he enjoys life, that I delightfully tell his tale, and dedicate my writing! Therefore, this being so the case (that is, for the other individuals involved, who wish to remain anonymous), if there are any names which match those who remain alive in public life, or who even have recently passed on unto the heavens, then it is of an entire coincidence, and of no intentions whatsoever on the editor’s or publisher’s part, that they are listed herein.

 

 

Author's Preface to the Third Volume

            I must apologize to my readers, who may find my researches to be a bit scattered, for I should, as any dandy journalist might, to have all my studies prepared before I even dared dream of a first publication back in A.D. 1689. However, some news has just but recently surfaced to my attention within the past five years, and I would be but a wretch, and a scourge to the journalistic science, if I did not do my duty and recall what incredible events that had happened to myself concerning the afore published Sea Journal.

            No, I did not find yet another Sea Journal to bring forth to my reading public, but rather I believe that I have actually found the man, as incredible as it may sound, by whom the Sea Journal was actually written. So, before I even begin to tell this story in its entirety – of the chance meeting with this interesting individual, and of the difficulty that I had even getting to see this said individual – I will first republish here, in this third volume, for your reading pleasure, the contents of both the first and second volumes of The Sea Journal; but, especially for those – as few as there may be – who have not had a chance to enjoy them as of yet. And then, as an after-thought, I will readily tell my readers of my recent, incredible adventure!

– Sir John Roe, London, A.D. 1700.
 

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume I

 

THE

SURPRIZING & HORRID

PREDICAMENT,

BEING FOUND ABOARD

THE THOMPSON OF HIS MAJESTY'S NAVY,

AND KNOWN ONLY AS

THE SEA JOURNAL,

HAVING NO KNOWN AUTHOR,

AND DESCRIBING, IN RIDGED DETAIL,

THE ANTICIPATING, HAIR-RAISING

REALIZATION OF ONE ABOUT

TO BE OVERTAKEN BY

PYRATES.

 

EDITED AND RELEASED

BY HIS MAJESTY'S KIND PERMISSION

THROUGH SIR JOHN ROE

LONDON, A.D. 1690

PUBLISHED BY THE “ADMIRAL’S STERN”

LONDON, ENGLAND, PATRICK JONE’S STREET

 

 

Author's Preface to the First Volume

            I have gathered, through persons I wish to keep unknown, a rather large journal, similar to that of a ship's log (but one which was not kept by a captain), that contains, within its massive volume, only a couple of pages of written words. But these words, few as they may be, prove to be of fact and truth, and are to be considered a rather interesting and somewhat horrid predicament. The "Sea Journal", as it now has come to be known, was found well hidden in a wooden chest that was aboard the Thompson: a large man-of-war of his majesty's navy. It is said that the chest was removed from a captured Pirate Ship, and was found in the largest of its cabins, which did contain many interesting things. But, as noteworthy as they indeed are, none even compare to the curious "Sea Journal" in question. This unique narrative issues, with true suspense, a rare account of what it is like to be overtaken by murderous bandits. And, as interesting as the documentation reads, the ending abruptly stops in a mysterious like manner. But, to which ship was captured by these rogues also remains a mystery, for many ships were released from the port of Bristol around the same time, and several of these were announced missing at sea. So, as to whom the unfortunate victims were, and to the curiosity of many other questions, will, thus far, have to remain unanswered. With this in mind, and even though the work has no known author, I would like to present for the first time to the public the contents of this most fascinating Journal.

 – Sir John Roe. London, A.D. 1689

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume I

 

23 July, 1673

It has now been two days since we have started out to sea; I have been waiting for this moment all my life, and it is because of this reason that I have decided to write all my adventures and explorations into this journal. In the days that will follow, one must forgive my shy narrative, for I am unfamiliar with a seaman's way of phrasing myself when I speak of the wonders of the ocean. But, I will explain its beauty to the best of my ability. When we had started out on our journey from the port of Bristol two days ago, I was very uncertain of what was going to happen in the days to come, for I have never been to sea before, and in my youth I have merely observed it from a distance. But, those first glances, as short as they were, gave me a knowing feeling that one day the high seas would become my destiny. And here I am, filled with greedy anticipation to readily grasp the world of sailing, grip its tail, and to let it take me withersoever it desires – which in this case is the island of Jamaica, lying in the West Indies. Upon learning that there was a ship charted thither, I was one of the first people to sign up to go over. But, I am not going as a mere visitor – no! – I have given up my past life, and I am now to become a sugar planter in that garden of Eden. What a grand life to start anew!

[It is completely strange, and of great fascination, that this man, whomsoever he may have been – or rather "is" – has given us no clue to his real identity at this particular time in his telling; the positioning place of which it would have been grand to set. – Sir John Roe]

These first couple of days have been harsh on me, however, and I have become very ill, and can eat not a thing. I heard some of the crew members say that I have an illness which they call "sea-sickness." But, whether the sea can actually make one sick or no, I cannot fully tell. However, my suspicions are that it is the constant rocking of the ship that unease’s my stomach, making it ail so. And I believe that the taunting of the ship's mates are hardly justified in saying that the sea releases sickening fumes that causes this illness, and overcoming this can only be achieved by one getting what they call "sea-legs." But, as to where I can purchase such a thing, they did not say. On the other hand, they did laugh plentifully and said that I was a "land-lubber," and when I inquired of what they were referring, they added that this name was a compliment for a gentleman who had never been to sea before. But, when they started laughing again, I doubted what they had said. At this last stroke of laughter, however, I bellowed out toward them: "I am no fool!" And, I said this with such a force that their laughter did cease. Encouraged by this silence, I continued: "I may not have ever been to sea before, but I challenge any of you to give me one good math equation!" At this, a cloud came over their heads, and even though there were eight of them of whom I addressed, I stood my ground and let not their hateful looks intimidate me. On the contrary, I boldly and very angrily went on: "One does not have to be born at sea to be termed not a fool; I am an accountant from London, and I say proudly that each one of you would be lost in my world. Can any of you deny this?" And, nay a one said a word. Instead, they broke up and went their separate ways. I was glad that they did not try to start a quarrel with me, for I was still weak from my illness at this time – this being only four hours ago – and still I am feeling bad; but, I seem to be doing much better now.

 

 

24 July, 1673

5:25 A.M.

It being now morning, I think that I will get myself up on deck, to try and take in some refreshing morning air. I will continue to write more in my Journal perhaps later this afternoon. 

 

 

6:43 A.M.

I know I said that I would wait until this afternoon to write more, but a rather strange occurrence has happened that I thought I should write about. A ship has been spotted, that might perhaps be a Pirate ship, but I cannot jump to any sort of conclusions – but, you never know in these waters! I will go and take another look.

 

6:55 A.M.

They are getting closer, but they are waving an English flag, and that settles any theory that it is a Pirate ship, as many of the passengers had feared . . . but, wait! . . . I just heard some of the passengers screaming . . . I can hear up above me the men saying that the English flag on the other ship has just dropped, and they have instead hoisted the black flag, of skull and cross bones! I must go and take a look.

 

 

AN AFTERTHOUGHT BY SIR JOHN ROE

            As I had mentioned before, the narrative ends in an abrupt manner. The reader, no doubt, can begin to guess – along with a great amount of imagination thrown in, no doubt – what may have happened next. Of our great interest in the literary world, we should add this small portion of this Sea Journal; for, as I have before said, it delivers, as any reader can perceive, a very rare account of the anticipated feeling of one being overran by murderous bandits; even if the thought is horrific to some.

 

            Again, my thanks go out to those before mentioned individuals who have brought this journal to my attention; and a special thanks must be delivered to His Majesty, our King William III., for royal approval of publishing this work, seeing as it was found onboard his naval vessel.

 

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume II

 

THE

SURPRIZING & HORRID

PREDICAMENT,

BEING FOUND ABOARD

THE THOMPSON OF HIS MAJESTY'S NAVY,

AND KNOWN ONLY AS

THE SEA JOURNAL

HAVING NO KNOWN AUTHOR,

AND DESCRIBING, IN RIDGED DETAIL,

THE ANTICIPATING, HAIR-RAISING

REALIZATION OF ONE ABOUT

TO BE OVERTAKEN BY

PYRATES.

AND OF A SEPARATE JOURNAL

FOUND RECENTLY

WRITTEN BY THE HAND

OF AN UNKNOWN SEA-RAT,

A SELF-CLAIMED PYRATE,

WHO DESCRIBES HIS LIFE

INCREDIBLY CLOSE AS TO

BEING THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR

OF THE BEFORE SAID

SEA JOURNAL.

 

EDITED AND RELEASED

BY HIS MAJESTY'S KIND PERMISSION

THROUGH SIR JOHN ROE

LONDON, A.D. 1694

SECOND VOLUME

PUBLISHED BY THE “ADMIRAL’S STERN”

LONDON, ENGLAND, PATRICK JONE’S STREET

 

 

Author's Preface to the Second Volume

            To my utter surprise, and unbeknownst to me at the time of my settings-forth of the first volume, it was brought to my attention, by a strange looking lad, of another Journal, keenly familiar to the first. The book was rather sea-worn, by its undesirable appearance. However, when turning over the leaves of this brittle book, I was struck with such an awkward cord, I knew in a moment that I had at last found more pieces to the puzzle!

            Where this strange looking lad, who appeared to be perhaps thirteen years of age, had obtained such a book, I cannot entirely tell, for he was extremely silent about the matter, but did mention that after I having had published the article concerning the first Journal, I would be readily interested in reading this one. And he is entirely correct.

            I will say no more concerning this work, but rather will let my readers determine for themselves the value of such a composition.

– Sir John Roe. London, 1693

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume II

 

August, 1673

It has now been about two weeks since I have joined this Pyrate crew. I know not what day that it actually is, but I do know that we are in August. I have practically lost track of the days, for this adventure has been turmulous, and extremely nerve-wrecking. Since I have left Bristol not too long ago, I never dreamt that I would be replacing a life of a sugar planter for that of a life of Piracy. I perhaps will not be able to write much in this new Journal of mine, for I do not know what to think of my new crew as of yet, but I will try and document my adventures as much as possible when I get the chance. As for now, I am writing this in a very dim light – one candle that I was allowed to have by my bunk side – and of which is a fresh piece, and hopefully will last me for a while; and, because of which I will be able to continue to document my days, for I know not what my fate shall be hereafter. Yesterday, I don...

 

 

AN AFTERTHOUGHT BY SIR JOHN ROE

            The rest, I am sorry to say, has been damaged by sea water. We perhaps will never get a chance to learn who this fascinating person is.

 

 

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume III

Presented by: Sir John Roe, A.D. 1701

 

Author’s Forward

            As I had promised, after I present, once again, the contents of both the first and second volumes of the Sea Journal, I would relate a rather peculiar journey that I had taken only a few months back. And, with the permission of a certain individual, who wishes to remain anonymous, I will relate to my dear readers a most interesting tale. And, as to the publishing of these first two volumes, which was several years ago, they have already had time to circulate throughout his Majesty’s kingdom, even to the English speakers of his realm which are scattered abroad throughout the known world, including the America’s and the Western Indies. And, these publications have surprisingly, and much to my joyous astonishment, become a much demanded work from the public as to be in print. I have taken all these requests into serious account, and have re-printed as much as I thought should be printed to fill such demands, and sending copies to every port imaginable. But, I also knew that if I did not publish this third volume, I would certainly be doing my readers a great injustice by holding back this incredible adventure story – that the author demands is of truth, and is of considerable interest! With these considerations in mind, I ask the reader to set aside whatever thing it is that is occupying them, and which is diverting their attention elsewhere, and place their mind upon this, which has taken me an entire year to edit and complete (and, indeed, five years to write!), and I will take this said reader – that is you, my friend – to tropical locales (which I had just within a year returned from), and to dangerous sea ports, to stormy oceans, and not to mention my running into murderous pirates! And, yes, you have guessed it, I have written all these adventures into my own Sea Journal, and am now publishing the highlights of the most fascinating days of my journey as I experienced them abroad in my search for the writer of the former Sea Journal.

– Sir John Roe, London, A.D. 1700

 

 

 

THE SEA JOURNAL

Volume III

 

5 January, 1695

            I have just finished publishing the second edition of The Sea Journal, as that lad of about thirteen years did deliver that curious second volume to me not too long back. But, I have just recently heard some news that I know is of life-changing events, especially for a journalist and writer such as myself, and so I have decided to write down the events of the upcoming days into my own Journal; for, I believe that the documentation of these days will prove to be of extreme value to my readers as I am about to set out on a sea voyage into unknown territory for myself.

            I almost feel like the writer of the first edition of the Sea Journal, who was a bit shy in his narrative when he wanted to describe the beauties of the ocean; for I, too, being a literary man stuck in the suburbs of our London city, am unfamiliar with a seaman’s way of phrasing myself when it comes to the deep blue, and of all the trimmings that boldly accompany it. Therefore, I will concentrate on my story rather than on such nautical matters, which I will leave to more literary sea-going writers, such as my contemporary Mr. Poison Jones, who’s publishing company is located not too far from mine, and who claims to be himself a literary Pirate, having just recently published his famous article, which he had called “A Piratical Duel,” which describes the famous duel between two Pirate captains: Captain Dan Wayward and Captain Raymond.

            But now, on to the life-changing news, as I am sure my readers are anxious to hear about. It would seem that because of how many editions of the Sea Journal have been circulated, a copy actually fell into the hands of the mysterious writer of both volumes of the Sea Journal. At least, this is what my source tells me. And, also, my source further tells me that the man can actually be found, right now – alive and kicking! – this very day. So, my destination certainly lies there, to find the mystery man in question...

 

 

 

AN INTERRUPTION BY TED ANTHONY ROBERTS

            I apologize to my modern audience of readers for this interruption, but I did not want to wait for an afterword to present something very interesting, which can be seen from the brief mention in Sir John Roe's entry of volume III of the Sea Journal (that is, of his own adventure to find the mysterious writer of the Sea Journal), that he had actually spoke of the famous article written by Poison Jones, a literary Pirate, who had described in detail the duel between Pirate Captain Dan Wayward (who, as many modern scholars have come to realize the truth of, and of whom we shall certainly see in this third volume, had proved to be the actual writer of the first and second Sea Journal), and of another, and more unknown in our own day, pirate named Captain Raymond. This article of Poison Jones proved to be as widely published and read as Sir John Roe’s Sea Journal. And, since this article has everything to do with Captain Dan Wayward (again, the actual author of the Sea Journal), and seeing also that it was the captain’s greatest claim to fame during the golden years of his piratical roaming, I thought it fit to republish the article here in this new edition of the Sea Journal, to the interest of the modern reading public . . . I cannot begin to say of how difficult this article was to find in its entirety, though, for most copies that have survived unto our day have actually been reprints, which were edited and abridged to fit shorter narratives. So, one can see the rarity and worth of what I have found.

            The following was first published in "The Glass Sea,” in London, England, on July 6, 1692, and was written, as I've already said, by a literary Pirate, who went by the infamous name of Poison Jones, a man who often wrote such articles periodically, having had them published in this small paper – which was a smaller publication from a rather obscure publishing house called: The “Porkman’s Vessel.” The reading public of this era were fascinated with the exploits of Pirates (as also can be seen by the words of Sir John Roe in the forward of his third volume of the Sea Journal), who would spend tons of English shillings just to have their hands upon recent written text of their adventures: whether it was true or not – for, it mattered little, just as long as the story was fresh and was taken from what was most recently rumored! But, this article in particular, shooting far above anything Jones had written in the past, had grasped the attention of the entire British Isles. The two Pirate Captains (the two duelists in question) it would seem, were always quarreling, and had decided once and for all to end this petty feud by having a final duel to the death between them. And, when news of this confrontation had reached the ears of the English people, it caused a rather large commotion. For years these two men were always being talked of in every English, Scottish, Welch and Irish town; but, this was to become their greatest moment in the eyes of the public – especially since the Pirates themselves were from Britain. At first, it was only rumored that the two captains had clashed; but, then, rumor had turned into reality, and inquiring British people craved for details.

            This is where Poison Jones stepped in. He saw his fortune in this opportunity, and could readily see English purses pouring their hard earned money into his. Now, whether Poison Jones was really a crew member of one of these captains, or was even there to witness the incident, it is hard to say; we merely rely on his short narrative, and accept it for the truth. When the article was finally published, the number of sales climbed so quickly that the presses could not print fast enough to satisfy the mobs of people who stood in the streets yelling for them. And, when read today, this short article still enhances fascination, creating wonderment at a period of when Piracy was heading toward its zenith – which came to its full power in popularity in the early 1700’s.

            Also, we must remember that this duel took place not too long before Sir John Roe actually met Captain Dan Wayward; so, when the two men finally met (which we shall certainly witness in the course of Roe's narrative), this duel would still have been fresh on the captain’s mind . . . And now, set here before us, are the contents of this article, detailing the breathtaking duel on that “unforgettable afternoon.”

 

– Ted Anthony Roberts, A.D. 2017

 

 

 

A PIRATICAL DUEL

by: Poison Jones

 

AN ACCOUNT

OF A FANTASTICAL DUEL

THAT TOOK PLACE BETWIXT 

TWO PYRATE SEA CAPTAINS

CAPTAIN DAN WAYWARD

AND CAPTAIN RAYMOND. 

AND HOW ONE STANDS THE VICTOR

PROVING HIMSELF AS TO BEING

THE GREATEST OF ALL PYRATES 

 

PUBLISHED IN

"THE GLASS SEA"

A JOURNAL AND PUBLICATION OF

"THE PORKMAN'S VESSEL" 

LONDON, ENGLAND

JULY 6, 1692

SET FORTH BY POISON JONES 

 

AND NOW PRESENTED WITH UPDATED REVISIONS

BY TED ANTHONY ROBERTS

A.D. 2017

 

 

A PIRATICAL DUEL

by: Poison Jones

            I would very much like to confirm the rumor that was said about the late Captain Raymond, styled a vicious and murderous Pirate, whom, it was told, was killed last month by the infamous Pirate Captain Dan Wayward, in a duel betwixt them to the death. As I am me-self an eyewitness to this entire affair, I would like, in this short article, and as I had before mentioned, to reveal what took place on that unforgettable afternoon.

            As that hot sun beat down strongly upon me mates and I that day, two large galleons, that belonged to these two Captains, had pulled along side, but not too near, a deserted shore line in the Caribbean; but, to which shore we pulled near, I will not here say, for truly it is a hideaway to many a sea-rovers, and that even now! And onto the hot beach sand we all went, me mates and I, to be witnesses of this great quarrel. I am me-self a crew member of Captain Wayward, and it is to him – the glorious victor – that I dedicate this here story; for, verily, there can be no other mortal on earth who can wield a demons blade such as he! And, it was this day that he hath shown the proof of it.

            As I said, we all stood on the beach, betwixt four palm trees were we that shielded the sun from our eyes. Raymond’s men stood behind him, and Wayward’s men alike stood behind him likewise.

            “Whom do ye think will win?” said a mate to me. “Whom do ye think?” says I. “Nay a one,” quoth he, laughing. “But maybe,” continued he, “they will kill each other, leaving us to decide upon a new Cap’um.” “Is that what ye wish, man?” says I, a great surprised at his saying. “I guess it doesn’t really a matter, dost thou think?" me mate asked of me. "For one rotten Cap’um is just as good as any other!” says he. “Aye,” agrees I, confirming me mates statement. But then it left me a thinking that captain Wayward was the best captain that ever I had. So then I now disagree with me mate’s thinking.

            The two captains stood gravely on guard, facing each other, not even moving a single muscle, and eyeing each other with this same sternness. Their blades were both unsheathed and crossed at this time, and both Captains were holding rapiers – cutlasses not being the choice of a Captain, mind ye.

            Captain Wayward, being a gentleman, as ye should well know, did let Raymond begin the fight, for he did not swing his rapier at all at the man until Raymond slashed at him. So, at this, the duel officially began. Of course, the entire mob of pirates on both sides were screaming and yelling their own captain on. And I was in voice, too, even though I knew what the outcome would be, seeing that me captain is the best swordsman at the Spanish Main. And don’t think to yer self, man, that I be lying for the captain, as to saying he be the best, for he is, says I – and the day, as I have said before, proved that me words ring true. For, as many a mate can testify, Raymond is no goof behind the blade; many a dead men could verify this, if they be able to speak at all from their dried up bones, that is!

            After only about five minutes of this ruckus, Raymond did seem to me to be getting a bit shimmered, as a land-lubber would appear to be upon his first vessel a-sailing; especially if he had no stomach for the sea. And Raymond kept falling back after this short time to the threatening blade of Captain Wayward, which really pressed on him hard.

            Only three minutes more could Raymond hold on, when Captain Wayward gave him a gusher through the middle of his gullet, of which we could see by the way Wayward’s blade passed through Raymond’s throat, and all was a done. There was silence on both sides at the sight of this picture before us, for Raymond, even though I knew he would fall, it still does a fascinating thing to the mind when you see such a great swordsman fall. And, I guess he deserves a moment of silence for the great things which he did, no-how. Even though many would consider him nothing more than a murderous bandit and thief and pirate, and the fate he received was but too light a punishment for him, yet to see this man in action might prove otherwise.

            As to what happened next, Captain Dan Wayward then gave the crew of Raymond an ultimatum – either join his crew, or there would be a fight to the death betwixt the two crews this day. Being a bit intimidated by the skillful blade, and of the authoritative nature of the captain, it did not take long for the other crew to give in to being another crew for the captain. And giving the command to his first mate, and splitting the crews in twain (as to seeing it would be safer to divide the crews in half), Wayward would then be able to have two captain’s shares of bounty for his take.

 

AN AFTERTHOUGHT BY TED ANTHONY ROBERTS

            Here ends the narrative by Poison Jones, which does, officially, open the door to Sir John Roe’s third edition of the Sea Journal. The combination of the two pack a walloping punch from an age when Piracy was in full swing, and of an age when people craved for detail, and from an age when journalistic science was most appreciated, and from a time when writers like Poison Jones and John Roe filled an ever growing need of first-hand piratical accounts.

 

            Having said this, and after reading the article, let's now continue where I have interrupted, in Sir John Roe's narrative, and of his own adventure, to find Captain Dan Wayward...

 

          Flynn Errol - Photo - Errol Flynn

 

 

 CONTINUATION OF VOLUME III, THE SEA JOURNAL

by: Sir John Roe

 

5 January 1695, continued...

            To my astonishment, on my maiden voyage, I actually ran into that thirteen year old lad, of whom had delivered to me the second volume of the Sea Journal. At first, at the sight of him, on the very first evening of being out to sea, my suspicions had suddenly ran high. When I first caught sight of him on the bridge, in the late evening, when the light of the day was beginning to fade somewhat, I said nothing to him at first. My initial inclination was to look quickly around the ship, with my eyes rather than physically roaming, to see if there were anybody else aboard that I may have known; or, to see if there were any suspicious characters walking about, seeing as this whole affair may have been some sort of ruse, to get me away from any sort of security, and so that they could do me some harm. Or, even perhaps, that I could be made a laughing stock of, and that my entire journalistic venture, when it came to both volumes of the Sea Journals, would end up being some person's jesting, and that there ended up to being no truth to any of this . . . My readers may think me to be somewhat skittish, and entirely too nervous of a person for fearing what may be thought as trifling affairs; but, I hope to prove that these things are mere precautions on the part of a careful journalist, to show that I have high concerns to present only truths to the public at large! Fortunately, though, my frets about the lad did not last for very long, for as soon as he had spotted me, he quickly came forward.

"Ah, good day, Sir John Roe!" he quickly inserted toward me.

"Good day," says I, somewhat confused, as I certainly was looking a bit perplexed.

Seemingly, not noticing my expression, the boy continued: "It's good to see that all is going according to plan, sir!"

At that, I was certainly taken aback! "To plan?" I quickly injected.

"Very much so! And my master will be coming up on deck very soon to fill you in on the details of the journey."

"Your master?"

"Yes. My master – mister Mark Johnson."

"Is that name supposed to mean something to me?" I quickly asked, while forming my brows into a frown.

"Well, it should, sir, considering that he's been giving you helpful hints to find the man that you seek."

"What's that?" I asked, astonished at the young man's words.

But, instead of replying, he looked behind me, while his eyes began to widen, and with a smile now forming on his face. "Ah!" he said, happily, "here is my master now!"

Of course, I spun around to see him of whom he spoke. Coming up near to me was a middle-aged man, who seemed to be a gentleman by his baring, but not very wealthy by his appearance. I'd say that he was mid-ranged in his weight, and unlike most Englishmen, he wore a very large mustache and beard, which began as black in color, but were starting to gray somewhat. I noticed that he wasn't smiling, and had no expression to note, but he did walk directly up to me with his hand extended for the shaking.

"Sir John Roe, I presume," he said.

Even though confused on whom he was, I took his hand nonetheless. "Mister Mark Johnson, I presume."

"That is correct," he confirmed.

We then stopped shaking hands, and I wasted no more time: "And just exactly who are you?"

"I apologize for the secrecy, but you must understand the dangers that are involved . . . You actually know me as Smith."

"Smith!" I said, astonished. "You're my source – my supplier of the Sea Journals."

"Please, we cannot speak out here, in public. Let's find a quite spot for me to expound."

 

***

 

"So, why all the secrecy?" I asked him, when we had found a better place to speak. "I cannot see the problem of you just letting me in on a good story."

"But, it's not that simple," he said. "First of all, and I hate to say this, but you have been baited from day one!"

"Baited? What do you mean?"

"I actually work for Captain Dan Wayward."

"Captain . . . who?"

"Captain Dan Wayward. He's the author of the Sea Journals."

"Oh, wait a moment! Isn't he the Pirate captain who recently won that duel, which Poison Jones recently wrote about?"

"Yes, he's one and the same man. Well, he's been sending you his old Journals so that you would write about him; so, that you could help build his fame."

"How is that? Didn't the first Journal come from one of his majesty's naval ships? How could he plant that there?"

"I planted it there! I signed on as a crewman, and had snuck into the cabin when nobody was looking, and planted the Journal therein. Once it was found, and made to look legit, it was easy to convince folks that it the chest had been found aboard a pirate ship."

"Is the Journal a fake?" I quickly asked, fearfully.

"Oh, no, it's real enough – it just wasn't on the king's naval ship until I planted it there. When the captain was overtaken by an actual pirate crew, he joined them, and had brought the Journal with him. It certainly only had a few entry's written within, as you had found it, and hasn't been tampered with in the slightest. He just didn't write in it anymore, and it had remained in his possession for years afterwards, untouched. The second Journal is real, also, but it really was waterlogged in one of his skirmishes with another naval vessel. Therefore, he thought it would be a good idea to place that into your hands, too. He felt that anticipation as to whom the man was behind the Journals would continue to build through your written words. And then, when he finally meets you, you can immortalize him for whom he has become – a famous pirate captain. More famous, he hopes, than any other before him, after you are done writing about him!"

"I must say, I don't know if I should be flattered or offended by this trick!"

"Does this mean that you wish to go back home now? That would certainly put him out! He has worked so hard to be immortalized, and the thought that you would return home would crush him!"

"Well, I didn't say that I was offended; but, even if I were, it wouldn't be the journalist in me that is so! I certainly have to follow this thing through to the end. The public at large wants answers, and even if the captain has played this trick on me to immortalize himself, I say the trick has already won out, for the public is certainly eager for a full story, and I intend on giving it to them, no matter what the captain has done . . . But, why all this secrecy?"

"Well, there is more to the story..."

"I figured."

"You know the duel that we just spoke about, which was between Captain Wayward and Captain Raymond, that was written by Poison Jones?"

"Yes."

"Well, it would seem that Captain Raymond has survived the duel after all!"

"What? How is that even possible?"

"Well, after they left the man for dead – they didn't even bother to bury him, and just left him lying on the beach, untouched – he suddenly turned back up again!"

"Really?" I eagerly asked, with my journalistic ears suddenly in tune. "Where at?"

"His old ship!"

"How did he get there?"

"We're still working on the details of that. We cannot say at this time, but there certainly seems to be some spies in our midst."

"Spies? What do you mean?"

"You think the world of piracy is simply attacking ships only? Of finding and burying treasure only? This is a world that is complex, which is filled with politics!"

"Alright, you are losing me here . . . politics?"

"Not of the sort that belongs to kingdoms and governments of the known world, mind ye, I am speaking of a network of politics and spies right in the wake of the pirate world. It's something that hasn't reached the attention of the outside world. Well, not at least until you make it known!"

"Let me get this straight – there are spies in the world of piracy, of whom weren't planted in their midst by the governments of kings?"

"Well, I didn't say that didn't happen, too – for we've caught several fellows before, which were sent in as spies from kings – but more than that, you don't know whom you can always trust in the 'brotherhood.'"

"Really?" I said a second time, being extremely intrigued by this bit of unknown news.

"Anyways, he got back aboard his old ship, and killed the captain there that was planted by my captain, who was Captain Wayward's former first mate. Most of the men on that ship were Raymond's to begin with, so the men that were for Wayward quickly adapted to the new crew – it would've been their throats, otherwise! So, you see, this changes things somewhat, and I need to warn you to beware of who comes up to you, and acts friendly at first."

"But, why me? What have I done?"

"Why, you've been immortalizing Captain Raymond's enemy! And, I'm sure he doesn't take too kindly to that! I have sources that tell me that he is privy of your intent of interviewing Captain Wayward; and, I'm sure, that he would like to stop that!"

This bit of news didn't sit too well with me; and, mister Johnson was quick to notice it.

"But, do not worry, mate, this here crew, aboard this ship, are all friends with Captain Wayward, and we'll see you safely through!"

 

 ******

 NEW MUSKETEER NOVEL NOW AVAILABLE TO BUY!

CLICK HERE for Plot Details, and to Read the Introduction and First Three Chapters!

 AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE FROM VARIOUS ONLINE BOOKSTORES, INCLUDING Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million & GoHastings.com

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Product Details (From Amazon.com)

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace (November 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449913172
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449913175
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds

 

READ WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT DONAREE:

"Nicely done. I really enjoyed the history in the introduction and the duel is well written. Best of luck with the novel!" ~ Author David Lee Summers, author of five books: Vampires of the Scarlet Order, The Solar Sea, and the "Old Star" science fiction series: The Pirates of Sufiro, Children of the Old Stars, and Heirs of the New Earth. www.davidleesummers.com

"Very exciting read! Felt like I was there witnessing the action!" ~ Candle Artist Jfay,
www.studio3bonline.com

"I really enjoyed the humour and really laughed, not at Monsieur de la Donaree but with Monsieur de la Donaree! I dont know if you wrote it in this spirit but if you had a bit of Molière in you, I would not be surprised! He knew how to study people and would turn situations into a comic play! I laughed out loud, this is a gem! Not only de la Donaree is a fine sword, he has also a fine nose when it comes to pinpoint personalities, I'm talking about the Inkeeper and his situation with the wife here!! The second part is indeed in pure swashbuckling spirit, in rhythm and enthusiasm! And the end is a cliff-hanger! The beginning is "cocasse" (funny) as they might have said then in Gascony, and witty! Indeed Alexandre Dumas had a sense of humour too and satirically created at least one of his character ( in another book) to a character made up by Molière in one of his comic play. And Molière also took his inspiration from Dumas' s Musketeers and "The Man in the Iron Mask." I liked it! I had fun while reading this chapter about Monsieur de la Donaree, as while following the spirit of the Musketeers you gave a contemporary touch to the text!" ~ Artist Nicole Marques,
www.myspace.com/nicolemarques

"Hurrah, Ted! I gleefully await the next installment! LOVE the romantic stuff! Bring it on! There are few things in this world I like better than a hot Viscount. Keep going, Ted! Bravo! Keep writing! I can't wait to read more! But it is par for the course as I am also a writer. Keep in touch!" ~ Author Genella de Grey, author of "Remember Me."
www.genelladegrey.com

"Wow - What a wonderful beginning. As a whole, you have a unique way of writing & you captivated me by a few sentences peaking my interest to continue. For instance: ...hazed by the early morning mist...I love it! I look forward to reading the next chapter. You've gained my interest. That was impresive & informative. You've still got the hook in & I'm dangling to hear more. Thanks for the sneak peak." ~ Aspiring Author R.F.Taylor: Rianna

"Well done. Chapter One entices the reader craving more. I will look for The Adventures of Monsieur de La Donaree the Musketeer on the web. Keep up the excellent writing..." ~
Ferf